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Pitch: “The Interim” Review **SPOILERS**

03 Oct
Pitch: “The Interim” Review **SPOILERS**

What concerned me in the pilot for Pitch is that the series appeared limited in scope. We can follow Ginny around all season long and watch her ascent to fame and stardom, but there didn’t seem to be much else to keep most viewers invested. The clubhouse struggles and the now-inevitable firing of Al are decent enough story arcs to have co-exist with the meteoric impact the team’s new female teammate was having throughout the sports world, but a large portion of the cast just seems to be along for the ride, playing their roles without the allure of any compelling characteristics or personalities. Thankfully, “The Interim” addresses this problem head-on, relying heavily on backstory, interlocking episode themes and strong character moments to flesh out the cast. The result is a much better sophomore outing that instantly becomes a more gravitating watch than the pilot.

Ginny’s backstory continues to shed light on her family history, as we got to spend some quality time between her and big brother Will (B.J. Britt). Their feel-good flashback scenes together were a welcome change of pace from the intensifying media and clubhouse atmospheres, but they also did a solid job showing us exactly how Amelia convinced Ginny to market herself. Through Will, Ginny sees the importance and the disadvantage of working with family: he’s a great brother who looks out for her and guides her down the right path, but as a college dropout with minimal agent expertise he’s incapable of opening new doors.

Even though Amelia checked out as a legitimate sports and entertainment agent at the time, her hold on Ginny has never went beyond becoming a walking, talking brand. So, some of the episode’s strongest material comes from watching their dynamic materialize in the flashbacks, and be reinstated by Ginny in the present time. Amelia prefers being in control, yet Ginny still holds the power to speak her mind and lay down ground rules. Both factors play a big part in Ginny’s Jimmy Kimmel interview, where she decides to go completely off-script to protect her manager (more on him later) and speak out over a rape scandal that was wrongfully dropped on her conscious by a female news reporter. This particular instant speaks to the character we were introduced to in episode one, and it also perpetuates the kind of work relationship she and Amelia currently have.

 

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A whole lot went down internally with the Padres in “The Interim”, as the players continued to lose gracelessly while an inappropriate tabling of words from Al in an old interview resurfaced. Obviously, Ginny’s presence in the locker room remains the primary source of the players’ recent struggles, but Pitch finds a neat way of spinning the issue in a number of different directions. For one, Al simply cannot manage this team; it’s very apparent now. He definitely has no control over his players, and the comments he made about Ginny while she was in the Minors confirms that he’s also too old-school to acknowledge the rules of interviewing that today’s managers must abide by. (In other words, he should know better than to outright say she’s hot in front of a camera.) I think Dan Lauria deserves some serious credit here, because even despite the alarming lack of sensitivity regarding Al’s handling of his resurfaced interview, he still portrays the San Diego manager with a sort of nuance that makes it hard to condemn him for his behavior.

Another way the episode successfully turns the Padres’ woes away from Ginny is in the front office. Frank insisting that Oscar – who worked his way up to GM with Al’s help – find a replacement manager by the end of the season is more justified than it was a week ago, but by learning Oscar’s backstory there is a stark amount of emotional stakes at play now. Oscar feels he owes Al the chance to redeem himself because Al opened doors he never dreamed he had access to. He went from being a middling utility player to helping run an entire Major League franchise, so Oscar’s ties to his supposed mentor extend past the ballclub’s overall performance. In addition, I think it’s pretty impressive that Oscar’s current plight parallels with Ginny’s, as both individuals are in prime positions to speak their minds while harnessing the power to make an impact decision.

 

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PITCH: Kylie Bunbury and Mark-Paul Gosselaar in the all-new “The Interim” episode of PITCH airing Thursday, Sept. 29 (8:59-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. Cr: Ray Mickshaw / FOX. © 2016 FOX Broadcasting Co.

 

The twist where Rachel Patrick (JoAnna Garcia Swisher), the same reporter who cornered Ginny over the rape scandal, was revealed as Mike’s ex-wife manifested into the episode’s best use of backstory. Her presence in Mike’s life affects him even after marriage, as we see him fighting to discover a concrete reason as to why he still plays baseball at his relatively advanced age. She also represents the life – and the happiness – Mike now yearns for. Just by the way he’s carried himself around his teammates, you can tell he’s been hiding something behind his proud exterior – and Pitch boldly uses his damaged relationship as fuel for character development; whether that progression involves him rallying the troops in the clubhouse, or finding himself at a bar with Amelia, another broken heart who experienced her own divorce years ago.

 

 

Here are some extra notes regarding this week’s episode:

  • Although this was a great week for some backstory, the flashbacks weren’t very kind to Amelia. The breakup between her and her husband is an odd, poorly-written scene, and on top of that it does very little to explain exactly what she saw in Ginny that made her quit her old job. Her past remains very murky – so does her presence in Ginny’s life.
  • Ditto for Elliot, who’s still just floating around being awkward.
  • That C-story with Blip and Evelyn is much more necessary than you’d think. Real life baseball players truly believe in rituals of all kinds, so Blip freaking out over the absence of his Funkmaster Flex t-shirt is very believable.
  • Ginny makes a conscious effort to “be one of the guys”, and goes about it in some plausible ways this week. One of which, however, is not with her dance moves.
  • Mike calling Ginny out for shaking him off is the kind of self-awareness this show needs to remain grounded in its source material. First of all, it shows the importance of batteries in the Majors: the best pitcher/catcher duos are always on the same page. Furthermore, it raises questions about Ginny’s pitch arsenal that deserved to be pondered. She knows her fastball sucks, but it truly is up to Mike to convince her that it’s still just as crucial to being successful as any one of her other offerings. A great pitcher understands that each pitch can help the other, and the sooner Mike can get Ginny to mature into that mentality the better.
  • Having the contrasting viewpoints in Colin Cowherd and Katie Nolan’s talk shows overlap each other was the neatest of touches the show has had thus far.
  • The in-game content in this episode was condensed considerably, which sort of helped the transitioning feel more organic. Also, Kevin Burkhardt’s play-by-play commentary, while not revolutionary in any sense, still trumps whatever the hell Joe Buck and John Smoltz were spouting out a week ago.
  • Evelyn joked about Blip not making the All-Star game because of his recent hitless streak, so that gives us a clearer time frame than before. It also omits my belief that the Padres were completely out of the NL West race; they’re just playing shitty baseball right now.

 

 

The Verdict:

 

“The Interim” did no favors for Amelia or her backstory, but was otherwise a very strong follow-up to last week’s pilot. Ginny continues to come into her own as a ballplayer, a teammate, and an supposed ambassador for women in America. Elsewhere, most of the main and supporting cast were fleshed out plenty, with Mike and Oscar in particular facing emotional plights that are compelling enough to come back for in the coming weeks.

 

 

 

 

RATING: 8.5

+ Ginny’s flashbacks with Will, Amelia

+ A number of strong character moments for Ginny and Mike

+ Al’s handling of his comments felt very real 

– Flashbacks do little to flesh out Amelia or explain her move to baseball

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